Gemtech Trek 556 Suppressor – Review & Impression

Looking For A 5.56 Suppressor For Your AR-15?

When looking for a suppressor for my AR15 I wasn’t sure what I even needed or wanted. What did I expect from a suppressor that would be sending full pressure 5.56/.223 rounds downrange? I had no clue. Hopefully this article will help you if you are in the same boat.

GEMTECH- TREK Suppressor: The Good

One of the most attractive attributes of this particular rifle suppressor is the price. It currently retails from about $475-$500 respectfully on a few different online retailers websites. For me, that’s a strong value considering the performance of this muzzle device. It’s a single contained, zero maintenance, rugged silencer that will perform as expected every time with no fuss. Gemtech claims there is no maintenance or cleaning required so lon as you are only shooting 5.56/.223 normal pressure rounds through it. They didn’t design this particular can to handle low pressure “sub sonic” rounds and they even state that if you want to shoot sub sonic cartridges that you use a specific brand. The majority of commercially available 5.56mm subsonic ammunition does not stabilize in the M16 barrel and will yaw while in the suppressor. Damage caused by this ammunition is not covered under warranty. If it is desired to reduce the bullet flight noise and sonic crack, we suggest that a .22 rimfire adapter be used with standard velocity .22LR ammunition. If subsonic .223 ammunition is a requirement, Gemtech recommends only subsonic ammunition manufactured by Engel Ballistic Research, Inc. To read the full warranty and manual you can Gemtech Trek Owners ManualGemtech Trek Suppressor Review

Besides the value the Gemtech Trek suppressor performs consistently well shot after shot after shot. It reduces the overall sound of the gun firing by 29 dB and is the equivalent to shooting .22 shorts out of a .22LR rifle.

Designed specifically to fill the needs of the law enforcement user, the TREK is a compact, durable and lightweight sound suppressor for the 5.56×45 mm centerfire cartridge. The TREK suppressor meets all OSHA and MILSPEC requirements for shooting without the use of hearing protection. The Trek is also available in a lightweight version, the Trek-T, fabricated from high strength, aircraft grade titanium alloys.

Why I Gave Up On Pistol Suppressors

Pistol Suppressors make no sense.  There, I said it.  You can hate me if you want but you know I’m right.

If you’re part of the growing number of gun enthusiasts who have tried a pistol suppressor or are lucky enough to actually own one, there are some things that should have stood out to you as you squeezed the trigger with that childish grin on your face.

FNX-45 Tactical with AAC Ti-rant 45

FNX-45 Tactical with AAC Ti-rant 45

The first thing you should have noticed is that the balance and weight of the gun are completely different than what a handgun normally feels like without a 6 to 9 inch steel and aluminum contraption hanging off the barrel.  Is it more than your hand strength could handle?  Probably not.  Is it comfortable?  If we are being totally honest then the answer is, “No.”  Handguns were not designed to hold that kind of weight out at the end of the barrel.  In fact, pistol suppressors had to be designed around the recoil mechanisms built into the handgun because a suppressor completely alters the physics of the firearm.  The primary reason for using a pistol instead of a rifle is it’s size and portability.  That reason is completely defeated when you double the length of the gun and change the ergonomics of the design.

The second thing you probably notice when you fire a handgun with a suppressor is that it’s not really as quiet as you thought it was going to be.  Now this will vary on many things including environment, caliber, ammunition type, suppressor type and various other factors.  But it’s generally understood that suppressors are never as quiet as what you see in the movies.  In fact, in many circumstances the noise is not even hearing safe by OSHA standards.  Is it quieter?  Absolutely.  Is it what you expected?  If it’s your first time, probably not.

5 things I learned from Aaron Cowan at Sage Dynamics

hqdefault2A few weeks ago I got a chance to take an outstanding training course from Aaron Cowan, owner and operator of Sage Dynamics.  I live in Colorado but have been following Aaron’s Youtube channel and Instagram for awhile.  My impression from what I saw is that he is the kind of guy who works hard at his craft and really knows what he is talking about, and also that he cares that what he teaches actually makes an impact on his students.

Sage Dynamics is based out of Georgia and I was resigned to the fact that the only way I was going to be able to take his classes was to travel to Atlanta to visit UrbanArmed.  My budget doesn’t usually stretch that far so my chances were slim.  But not to fear, Instagram came to the rescue.  Aaron was advertising a class right in my neck of the Eastern Colorado plains.  After promising my wife the moon, I packed my gear and joined 7 other local guys for Aaron’s Defensive Handgun Fundamentals and Defensive Handgun I classes.

My goal over the last several years is to take at least one handgun training class a year.  The last class I took left a lot to be desired, both in the skills we focused on and frankly the personality of the instructor.  I won’t waste time with details but I left that class feeling like I had wasted my time and money.  Based on what I had seen of Sage Dynamics, I was hoping for a much better class.  I was not disappointed.

5 Guns That Make Zero Sense

I’m not a firearms expert.  Not even close.  But like all modern Millennials, I have opinions.  My opinions are my own and I realize that they mean about as much as that silly trucker hat you wear to impress your equally worthless peers.

The firearms market has exploded in the last 8 years, thanks in part to a rise in unfounded fears of a zombie apocalypse and more importantly, very well founded fears that our sacred right to bear arms is in danger of falling within our lifetime.  It’s been said that Barack Obama is the firearms salesman of the year, 8 years running.  It’s hard to deny the impact a liberal presidency has had on the growing firearms market.  At the same time, the sunset of the Federal Assault Weapons Ban in 2004 reopened a stagnate market for both gun sales and firearms innovation.

This is where my worthless opinion finds it’s genesis.  Some of the designs spawned by this golden age of the gun culture can only be characterized as red headed step children (no offense to the soulless gingers out there).  I’d like to take a moment to recognize these bastards of the gun family.  These are guns that exist for no other reason than that perhaps we have run out of good ideas, or because the principle that the more it costs the more people want it, even if it’s ugly and serves no useful purpose.

Number 5:  Keltec KSG 12  

Yet another failed bullpup

Yet another failed bullpup.

Never has a gun been so disappointing after it’s initial hype than this plastic double magazine shotgun.  A bullpup design is a challenge for any platform, but it also very appealing if it can be done right.  Moistening the wet dreams of home defenders everywhere, the KSG promised a compact and ergonomic design that packed enough firepower to kill the bad guy and all his relatives without having to reload.